Abstract

In this commentary I will discuss the technical implementation of sound spatialisation in EDM (electronic dance music) performance practice and outline my compositional approaches involving these techniques. The use of space as a musical parameter in EDM is becoming more common as the accessibility of the technology increases. The technical means of performance and the sonic material combine to create a unique musical aesthetic and listening experience in EDM culture. An historical overview of compositions using spatial considerations as a main musical parameter will situate my work within this artistic practice. Different implementations and propositions of sound spatialisation, as well as the principal locations dedicated to this form of activity will be discussed to contextualise my work.

A fundamental part of my research concerns the use of spatialisation tools and techniques to enhance EDM through an immersive sound experience. Concepts and notions of musical ‘flow’ and live improvisation have shaped this research and the compositional and performance aesthetics that have come to underpin my creative practice. Furthermore, the idea of immersivity and the sublime have informed my compositional thinking, and this will be assessed in relation to my objective to create an enhanced listening experience in my live performances. A discussion of the blurred roles of composer/producer/performer will demonstrate how I consider my live performance practice to redefine what a composer of EDM can be. Thus, I consider this research to propose a viable model for modern EDM composers.

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